Woven Mountain Views

mood sewing network | simplicity 1099 | wovenThis was one of those “Awesome fabric + Simple pattern = Instant success” equations where the math went stupendously wrong. Here’s Simplicity 1099, slim view, in a double sided woven fabric from Mood NY’s top floor.

I had a little over a yard of this beauty, which I believe has some silk in it. It was wide enough to accommodate all 3 pieces of this SUPER easy pattern, while still allowing careful print placement. And I was oh, so careful! Tracing shapes of mountains at seams, laying tissue out until it was seamless– cutting was the biggest part of this hike, and I CLIMBED THAT MOUNTAIN, YO! Ready to claim victory,  I basted the whole skirt together. The front seam: perfection! I squealed, I raised my Kalkatroonan Flag…

then I caught the side view.

mood sewing network | simplicity 1099 | wovenNot so terribly bad, you say? Wait. THEN I CAUGHT THE OTHER SIDE VIEW.

mood sewing network | simplicity 1099 | wovenWHAT THE WHAT?! The rage that followed!!!! Listen, when you’ve spent 80% of your sewing time cutting out the pattern, thinking you’ve matched every little peak up to perfection, THERE IS ANGER. THERE IS SELF INFLICTED ANGER. How did I manage to do this to myself?

Did I mention this was a simple pattern? Well, it is. So simple, it’s apparently easy to lose track of which seam is which. Especially when you think you don’t need notches, because the pattern is THAT SIMPLE. No, you just go on ahead and leave those notches out, thaaaaat’s right, you’re so advanced, flipping the fabric for interest, matching up those mountains at the side seams… only, when you were cutting, you matched those mountains from side back seam to center front seam.

AND YOU DID IT TWICE.

mood sewing network | simplicity 1099 | wovenYep. When I realized the error of my ways, I took all of my basting out, and recut the back panel by shifting it up two inches, to make the mountains whole again. I’d lose length, but at least the print would match. GOOD IDEA. MEBBE WOULD HAVE WORKED IF I’D NOT MATCHED THE SIDE BACK SEAM TO CENTER FRONT SEAM A.G.A.I.N.

mood sewing network | simplicity 1099 | wovenAt that point, it was stop halfway up Everest, or forge ahead and finish, knowing that only sewists would get a headache at the side view. So forge I did. See that little wedge of white down by the hem? I jigsawed that into the back panel, after the second failed matching attempt, to make up for the lost length.

mood sewing network | simplicity 1099 | wovenIf I hadn’t done it in order to save a mistake, I’d call it a design element, because I love both sides of this nubbly, silky, sheeny, thick, textured stuff. (I believe it’s in-store only, but this print looks delicious!) I used the “wrong” side for a faced hem, and of course, for that promising front side panel…

mood sewing network | simplicity 1099 | wovenSigh. I’ll just have to remind myself to view it from the front only.

(And apparently I need to make that hook & eye tighter. IT NEVER ENDS WITH THIS ONE.)

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Comments


  • carolyn roemer
    January 28, 2016

    Skirt fun, I love it on you. Could this skirt have looked good with the side front seam sewn as you did ? And then long darts at the sides? And more darts in the back if needed? Or would that have spoiled the flow of the design?

    • oonaballoona
      January 28, 2016

      you know, it didn’t occur to me to try my usual trick of “what if i turn it around…” that just might’ve worked.

  • Nancy
    January 28, 2016

    I want the background fabric!!

    • oonaballoona
      January 28, 2016

      it’s a vintage sari! i’m trying to find a way to take indoor shots on dreary cold days :)

  • Muriel
    January 28, 2016

    LOOOVE …this skirt and your news flash….It looks wonderful on you… Glad you had fun with it…

    • oonaballoona
      January 28, 2016

      thanks, muriel! i did have fun, even though i tried my best to thwart myself…

  • Amy
    January 28, 2016

    It’s funny how we set such high standards for our pattern matching! I bet you seams just like these would be seen in ready-to-wear. But, I’m sorry you went through all the trouble to make it perfect only to have things get off. I do hope you won’t let it bother you too much though because this skirt is really fabulous!

    • oonaballoona
      January 28, 2016

      i do love the skirt, but man, i was so excited to see all those seams perfectly matched up! let’s just say i’ll wear it, but probably not to a sewists meet up :) ))

  • Becky
    January 29, 2016

    I love this fabric! And on you that skirt is beautiful! I just bought your suggested iron and can’t wait to try it. My Black and Decker just leaked on me once too often :) Love your advice and YES love, love, love the colors!

    • oonaballoona
      January 30, 2016

      excellent, i hope you love it! i’m thinking of buying another as a “don’t touch my sewing iron” iron ;)

  • Abu Saeed
    January 29, 2016

    Great fabric !
    Thank you for the fun and informative post and for the links for further information! I’m really inspired for your writing.

    • oonaballoona
      January 30, 2016

      you’re welcome, and thank you!

  • Cynthia
    January 29, 2016

    Great skirt and it looks fabulous on you. Thanks for reminding me that even the best seamstresses have days where nothing goes right.

  • Becky
    January 29, 2016

    That really is fabulous fabric! Not that I would expect anything less than fabulous fabric from you.

    • oonaballoona
      January 30, 2016

      thank you becky! it doesn’t hurt to have that top floor to wander around in…

  • Marina G. Villalobos
    January 30, 2016

    I feel most heartened by your experience matching because if this can happen to someone as talented as you, then I don’t feel so badly since I thought these mismatching print experiences, only happened to me! Thank you for being so forthcoming with your mistakes as well as your successes. Although, it must be said, the mismatched sides do not detract from how lovely the skirt looks on you. Most people don’t notice, they only take note of the overall effect and, as I stated above, the overall effect is lovely.

  • oonaballoona
    January 30, 2016

    well thank you, marina, for the lovely words! i think it’s important to share our mistakes as well– although i agree, this is one mistake i’ll wear!

  • Amy
    January 30, 2016

    I love you! I want to be just like you…

    I am teaching myself how to sew and you inspire me. Thanks for always making me smile…now…can we have the pattern? I am tall and this dress would suit me well. I would love to try to make one!

    • oonaballoona
      February 1, 2016

      it’s a skirt–simplicity 1099, but be warned, i’m 5’2 (ish) and the hem as-is was almost too short!

  • Fiona
    January 31, 2016

    I want this fabric!! You are much too hard on yourself, as you say, nobody but a sewer would know! I can’t even imagine the frustration!!

  • Angela
    January 31, 2016

    Goodness, while I would never wish such frustration to anyone sewing a garment, there is a sense of relief in knowing that I’m not the only one to torment themselves with such mistakes!

  • Lori
    February 1, 2016

    I think looks so fantastic on you and love the print. I think those things happen to all of us, we just learn how to conquer and go on! See you conquered the mountain.

  • Jessicathecat
    February 4, 2016

    I love the fabric and how it looks on you! Very nice. How about putting a piece of trim down the seams that offend, if you can find one suitably coordinated? (Although it looks fine now actually). Maybe even a solid in the blue tones?