Plaid wool knit sweater

I recently have fallen in love with a new silhouette for myself, and it’s been a lot of fun playing with it: a cropped pullover. Whether it’s in the form of a hand knit sweater (which started my obsession) or sewing my own tops, I’ve been loving this shape lately.

This version was the third I made from the same pattern, Butterick 7557 from around 1956. Great envelope artwork too, right?

Many vintage patterns specify types of fabric recommended, but this one didn’t. In my mind though, it was perfect for knits! Kind of a cropped vintage version of a Tilly & the Buttons Coco.

I made this version in a plaid Rick Owns wool knit. What a delightful fabric! Thick and squishy, enough grip it didn’t slide around at all when cutting, and the topstitching stitches just sunk right in.

On one side the knit stitches are clearly visible and the other site is more of a brushed texture, and I decided to go with that as the right side, even though it was probably meant to be the back.

I did take a tiny bit of a risk with the fabric. I really hate hand washing if I don’t absolutely need to do it, so I threw a swatch of the fabric in the wash. It came out exactly the same size as it went in! Since it was a swatch, I went ahead and threw it into the dryer, too. It came out the same height and just a tad narrower, which I was even able to kind of tug back into position. So… I went ahead and washed and dried the yardage. It might have beefed up the density a tad perhaps (hard to compare yardage to a small swatch), but it definitely didn’t change much. Now I can machine wash it, though I’ll probably line dry anyway.

Construction was a breeze, as I sewed the whole thing except the hems (which were just a simple zig zag) on my serger.

A tiny tip, if you construct on a serger but also need to trim seams as you go: I’ve come to find I’m a lot more accurate when I baste a neckband (or cuff) on first, checking to make sure I didn’t sew in any puckers or accidentally take up too much of the band on one side, causing it to look wonky. Then I can take it to the serger and trim and serge at the same time (since this has a 5/8″ seam allowance), and with no pins to worry about in a narrow space, to boot.

I love that stand up funnel neck so much!

Another large scale plaid for me. Why do I keep doing this to myself?! This time, I decided visually where I wanted the horizontal lines to fall (widest bands above and below my high bust), and matched the plaid at the side seams of the body. And then just cut each sleeve the same as one another. I actually managed to get some of the lines matched up on the sleeve but that was pure accident as it’s a dropped shoulder, so I didn’t even try to match it. I did match up the collar and used a different part of the plaid than where the neckline ends, to add a little visual interest.

I know you’re “supposed” to line up knit neckband seams at a shoulder seam, and in fairness the pattern specifies to do that, too. But after a first version I had a hard time telling the back from the front quickly (1 out of 100 chance I remember to sew a little ribbon into the back neck as a visual aid). So I centered the seam at the back neck so I could grab and go. Not going to lie, I totally put this on backwards still the other day. Ha ha!

I’m a knitter as well as a sewer, so the idea of sewing sweaters is not something I’m used to. But I knew this shape would be a great match for a wool knit, and I’m so glad I was right!

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Comments


  • Vanisha Griggs
    April 4, 2018

    Love love love this look, what a great everyday top. Now i need to find this pattern. The fabric is great also.

    Reply
    • Tasha Moss
      April 5, 2018

      The fabric is really dreamy and snuggly to wear! Thanks! I believe there’s someone selling a reproduced print of this pattern on Etsy, if you’re not able to find a vintage copy. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  • Jessie
    April 4, 2018

    Fabulously done! It looks great on you! You guys are all giving me courage to actually dig into my Gramma’s stash of fabric that I inherited. Some gorgeous vintage flares in there. (burnt orange plaid anyone??)

    Reply
    • Tasha Moss
      April 5, 2018

      Thank you! Ooh burnt orange plaid sounds like it could be fun. πŸ˜‰

      Reply
  • 1Stitchforward
    April 5, 2018

    It’s a fantastic look! Your outfits really do come together beautifully, and this silhouette suits you incredibly well. I Have tried to style something similar myself but as I’m much heavier at the bottom than at the top it makes me feel very self conscious. And the colours! Thank you for sharing πŸ™‚

    Reply
    • Tasha Moss
      April 5, 2018

      Thank you! You know, I found that it also looks really nice over a dress so if you haven’t tried something similar that way, it might possibly be a way to style it that you enjoy. I definitely think it can work for different body types. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  • Lori
    April 5, 2018

    Tasha this sweater looks amazing on you. You totally perfected the fit on this the way you always do. The shorter length compared to the original is total perfection and the sleeves are perfect as well. You look amazing in it. Just went to etsy and bought a copy of the pattern for myself.

    Reply
    • Tasha Moss
      April 5, 2018

      Thanks so much! The pattern is really a gem, that neckline is the best!

      Reply
  • PsychicSewerKathleen
    April 5, 2018

    I’m glad you reminded me that the Coco has the same neck – I have this pattern! I love this funnel neck too – comfortable but very chic. Love your top! I read or heard somewhere (I’m having another senior moment) that the secret to washing wool is NOT to shock it πŸ™‚ Start your water at the same temp as the fabric already is and gradually warm it up – the wool should come out just fine.

    Reply
    • Tasha Moss
      April 5, 2018

      Interesting tip! Well my wool was in our cold basement and I washed it on cold, so I guess that’s probably close to what they mean! Ha ha!

      Reply
  • Cennetta
    April 17, 2018

    Tasha, Your crop top is classic. Love the color and style.
    C

    Reply

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